Auroral Beads

Which processes in space cause these mysterious auroral beads?

This post is written by Aurorasaurus guest blogger Nadine Kalmoni, a PhD student at Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London in the UK. The first time I saw this incredible image of the aurora (Figure 1) was just before Christmas of 2015 as a twitter post by a member of the public. I remember thinking, “Wow!” Photos and[…]

Ca. ~1940. Credit: L. Evers of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute

Snap, crackle, pop! Care for some sound with that aurora?

This is a post by our guest blogger this month, Justin Oldham, who is a former graduate student from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and an instructor at the University of New Mexico. While studying aurora-related acoustics in Alaska I frequently encountered people who’d heard the northern lights during particularly intense displays on very still[…]

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Here’s what you told us about the many types of aurora seen in 2015

Thank you to those of you who contributed to auroral science in 2015! We’re excited to share some highlights of what we all collectively saw last year in the skies based on when you reported “Yes, I saw aurora!” Thanks for reporting through our form on our website – the answers you submit to each[…]

Adapting the Aurora View Line

How we are improving real time alerts, and your viewing lines

For hundreds of years, aurora sightings have left people intrigued – for both their beauty and unpredictability. In any moment, they can surprise us as bright flashes of light in the night sky, dark above us.  They appear like unexpected gifts, made of colorful swaths of light, dancing above us. In a dance that sometimes looks more like[…]

A pegboard with wooden dowels, an LED tea light, and a can lid (weighted with pennies covered by black duct tape and wrapped with foil). Note construction can be much improved.

Make Your Own Aurora

This post is available for re-posting on MAKER blogs. Please contact us at aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com to let us know. This post will share with you a new educational Maker idea for a hands-on fun aurora demonstration… but first, the motivation. Over 300,000 people attended the 2016 USA Science and Engineering festival in Washington, D.C. in April![…]

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Citizen scientists track March 6-7, 2016 aurora storm

Citizen scientists reported seeing aurora in the midlands of England, the north coast of the Netherlands, and areas in the United States such as Maine, New York, Minnesota and North Dakota. Check out the pictures from the storm and a video showing citizen science reports from March 6, 2016 at 10am EST to March 7, 2016 at 3am EST.