Animated gif showing how a user can turn the camera toward the sky to focus on dfiferent areas

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 3: Exploring Over a Thousand Nights of Aurora on Your Phone

Guest post by Jeremy Kuzub Attending AGU 20? Jeremy will be presenting Keogramist as a poster in The MacGyver Session: The Place for Novel, Exciting, Self-Made, Hacked, or Improved Sensors and Software Solutions to Understand Space Weather eLightning on December 15, 2020 at 6:00 AKT/7:00 PT/8:00 MT/9:00 CT/10:00 ET/15:00 UTC. There will be a Q&A element, so bring any questions[…]

A still image with aurora in the background shows the mauve arc and green "picket fence" features of STEVE

Aurora-Chasing Citizen Scientists Help Discover A New Feature of STEVE

The plucky subauroral phenomenon STEVE (Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement) has struck again! Teamwork between citizen scientists and scientists Joshua Semeter, Michael Hunnekuhl, Elizabeth MacDonald, Michael Hirsch, Neil Zeller, Alexei Chernenkoff, and Jun Wang, has led to new information and new mysteries about features in STEVE’s dapper green picket fence structure. The team’s work—which includes[…]

An animation shows how the center slices of each moment in a moving all-sky camera are placed next to each other to create a keogram

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 2: What is a Keogram?

Guest post by Aurorasaurus Ambassador Jeremy Kuzub This article is the second of three about how researchers and citizen scientists record and explore years of auroral activity using all-sky cameras, keograms, and software visualizations. The first post is available here.  Looking Up The first step in aurora borealis research is just looking up at the night[…]

Two women hold up an award and plates of aurora and STEVE hummus

Nerdy Science Recipes for Your Next Party!

Each year, Goddard Space Flight Center holds a collegial poster party for scientists and engineers to showcase their ongoing research. One of the award categories is “Best Science as Food.” What better opportunity to try ideas for hands-on education? Aurorasaurus and our colleagues Dr. Anne-Marie Novo-Gradac and Dr. Kevin Novo-Gradac decided to represent the Heliophysics department by coming up[…]

Two women in cold weather gear hold up sings that say 19 degrees Celsius, N 17.55, E 15.06, (Bamsebu), Happy Thanksgiving! (music notes) Love from Hilde, Sunniva, and Ettra" and "AGU 100."

Extreme Citizen Science: Seeing the Invisible

UPDATE 12.12.19 On Tuesday, December 10, Clemson University’s CHI rocket successfully launched, and Hearts in the Ice were able to take 65 timelapse photos at about an 80° angle: “When the text came in ‘ready to launch in seven minutes’ we dressed like firemen and we were out the door as quickly as possible….to experience all[…]

Bamsebu (1)

Hearts in the Ice: Citizen Science in the Arctic

If you turn on the news for very long, you’re likely to hear about some of the changes our planet is going through. Temperatures are on the rise, glaciers are receding, precipitation patterns are changing ⁠— and many of these developments are most obvious in the polar regions.  A formidable two-woman team is heading to[…]

Caption:  What’s wrong with this picture?  Read on!

Debunking the aurora myth: What actually causes an aurora?

What’s wrong with this infographic? A common misconception about the aurora is that it’s formed by particles streaming straight from the sun. But that’s not the whole story. By only considering the solar wind, we leave some key questions unanswered like why do we see the aurora at night (when we’re facing away from the sun)? The answer lies in magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail.