Two women hold up an award and plates of aurora and STEVE hummus

Nerdy Science Recipes for Your Next Party!

Each year, Goddard Space Flight Center holds a collegial poster party for scientists and engineers to showcase their ongoing research. One of the award categories is “Best Science as Food.” What better opportunity to try ideas for hands-on education? Aurorasaurus and our colleagues Dr. Anne-Marie Novo-Gradac and Dr. Kevin Novo-Gradac decided to represent the Heliophysics department by coming up[…]

Two women in cold weather gear hold up sings that say 19 degrees Celsius, N 17.55, E 15.06, (Bamsebu), Happy Thanksgiving! (music notes) Love from Hilde, Sunniva, and Ettra" and "AGU 100."

Extreme Citizen Science: Seeing the Invisible

UPDATE 12.12.19 On Tuesday, December 10, Clemson University’s CHI rocket successfully launched, and Hearts in the Ice were able to take 65 timelapse photos at about an 80° angle: “When the text came in ‘ready to launch in seven minutes’ we dressed like firemen and we were out the door as quickly as possible….to experience all[…]

Bamsebu (1)

Hearts in the Ice: Citizen Science in the Arctic

If you turn on the news for very long, you’re likely to hear about some of the changes our planet is going through. Temperatures are on the rise, glaciers are receding, precipitation patterns are changing ⁠— and many of these developments are most obvious in the polar regions.  A formidable two-woman team is heading to[…]

Caption:  What’s wrong with this picture?  Read on!

Debunking the aurora myth: What actually causes an aurora?

What’s wrong with this infographic? A common misconception about the aurora is that it’s formed by particles streaming straight from the sun. But that’s not the whole story. By only considering the solar wind, we leave some key questions unanswered like why do we see the aurora at night (when we’re facing away from the sun)? The answer lies in magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail.

Auroral Beads

Which processes in space cause these mysterious auroral beads?

This post is written by Aurorasaurus guest blogger Nadine Kalmoni, a PhD student at Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London in the UK. The first time I saw this incredible image of the aurora (Figure 1) was just before Christmas of 2015 as a twitter post by a member of the public. I remember thinking, “Wow!” Photos and[…]

Ca. ~1940. Credit: L. Evers of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute

Snap, crackle, pop! Care for some sound with that aurora?

This is a post by our guest blogger this month, Justin Oldham, who is a former graduate student from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and an instructor at the University of New Mexico. While studying aurora-related acoustics in Alaska I frequently encountered people who’d heard the northern lights during particularly intense displays on very still[…]