Laura's hand (complete with fabulous aurora nail wraps) grips a device like a walkie-talkie

Ham it Up—On the Air!

Amateur Radio for Students and the General Public By Laura Brandt (museum educator), Connie Atkisson (teacher), and Liz MacDonald (scientist) Last fall, Dr. Liz and Laura got their Technician (entry-level) ham radio licenses as part of auditing a class for teachers, grad students, and undergrads on The Physics of Ham Radio taught by Rice University[…]

Animated gif showing how a user can turn the camera toward the sky to focus on dfiferent areas

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 3: Exploring Over a Thousand Nights of Aurora on Your Phone

Guest post by Jeremy Kuzub Attending AGU 20? Jeremy will be presenting Keogramist as a poster in The MacGyver Session: The Place for Novel, Exciting, Self-Made, Hacked, or Improved Sensors and Software Solutions to Understand Space Weather eLightning on December 15, 2020 at 6:00 AKT/7:00 PT/8:00 MT/9:00 CT/10:00 ET/15:00 UTC. There will be a Q&A element, so bring any questions[…]

A still image with aurora in the background shows the mauve arc and green "picket fence" features of STEVE

Aurora-Chasing Citizen Scientists Help Discover A New Feature of STEVE

The plucky subauroral phenomenon STEVE (Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement) has struck again! Teamwork between citizen scientists and scientists Joshua Semeter, Michael Hunnekuhl, Elizabeth MacDonald, Michael Hirsch, Neil Zeller, Alexei Chernenkoff, and Jun Wang, has led to new information and new mysteries about features in STEVE’s dapper green picket fence structure. The team’s work—which includes[…]

Listening and Learning Recap

After our first anti-racism meeting in support of #Strike4BlackLives, the Aurorasaurus team has been holding monthly meetings alongside members of the aurora science and citizen science communities on further action items to hold ourselves accountable. If you are interested in joining us for future meetings, please let us know at aurorasaurus.info@gmail.com. In this post, Liz[…]

A colorful photo of a flat landscape shows faint green and red aurora pillars

Sharing the story: Aurorasaurus Intern Vince

My backstory with the Aurora and Aurorasaurus The moment I saw my first aurora is forever ingrained in my memory.  The Halloween Storms of 2003 left the night skies above my Minnesota house dancing with green and purple lights, and seeing them at four years old as I walked down my neighborhood street, trick-or-treating with[…]

An animation shows how the center slices of each moment in a moving all-sky camera are placed next to each other to create a keogram

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 2: What is a Keogram?

Guest post by Aurorasaurus Ambassador Jeremy Kuzub This article is the second of three about how researchers and citizen scientists record and explore years of auroral activity using all-sky cameras, keograms, and software visualizations. The first post is available here.  Looking Up The first step in aurora borealis research is just looking up at the night[…]

A landscape with a sky crossed by green and purple bands of aurora, along with other sky phenomena: STEVE, the ISS, and Comet NEOWISE.

A Frenzy of Sky Phenomena: Reflections on a Once-in-a-Lifetime Chase

In the early morning hours of July 13, a slow-moving coronal mass ejection from the Sun arrived early on its journey to Earth. That afternoon, word spread across social media in Europe, Canada, and the US: there might be aurora tonight. No one knew, however, whether it would last long enough for this part of Earth[…]

A computer-generated tent glows in a snowy forest, underneath fisheye video capture of the Northern Lights.

Exploring Aurora from Home

Aurora citizen science often involves gazing at the sky outdoors, but there is a lot of learning and citizen science that can be done from home! In this post, we have compiled some resources for families, students, and aurora enthusiasts. Best of all, we are here for you if you have questions on this material—tweet[…]