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Summer (or Winter!) Aurora Reading List

It’s June, the season for graduations and vacations. Whether you’re soaking up the sun at the beach, curling up in a cozy cabin, or enjoying an evening at home, we’ve pulled together a reading list of fantastic books that explore aurora science and citizen science using words and descriptions that are easy to understand. If[…]

A box highlights a tiny fragment of the sky

A Sky Full of Chocolate Sauce: Citizen Science with Aurora Zoo

by Dr. Liz MacDonald and Laura Brandt Originally posted to the Zooniverse blog Viewing the aurora in person is a magnificent experience, but due to location (or pesky clouds) it’s not always an option. Fortunately, citizen science projects like Aurorasaurus and Zooniverse’s Aurora Zoo make it easy to take part in aurora research from any[…]

A Jeopardy contestant is next to a screen that reads "The Sun's corona propels this stream of particles continuously at hundreds of miles per second."

Daily Double: Solar Wind

We were excited to see “what is the solar wind” featured recently as a Daily Double on JEOPARDY! While the contestant missed the answer (oops!) it raises a valid point: the solar wind is an often misunderstood thing, and can be challenging to communicate. In this blog post, we’ll pull together some resources so that[…]

A graph shows a sudden upward jump in Solar Wind Power intensity

Laura Learns Aurora: I’ve Got the Power!

Laura here! I am an aurora enthusiast, but new to the science side. Fortunately, the Aurorasaurus blog and website are full of great resources that I’ll be sharing out as I cultivate my knowledge.  One of these is the Space Weather Data page, a graph that shows the strength of solar wind power. In short,[…]

A landscape with a sky crossed by green and purple bands of aurora, along with other sky phenomena: STEVE, the ISS, and Comet NEOWISE.

A Frenzy of Sky Phenomena: Reflections on a Once-in-a-Lifetime Chase

In the early morning hours of July 13, a slow-moving coronal mass ejection from the Sun arrived early on its journey to Earth. That afternoon, word spread across social media in Europe, Canada, and the US: there might be aurora tonight. No one knew, however, whether it would last long enough for this part of Earth[…]

A smartphone on the Aurorasaurus Twitter sits next to a small red long-necked dinosaur plush

It Takes a Community to Raise Aurorasaurus: Gratitude and Retrospective

Over the past decade, Aurorasaurus has grown from a persistent idea in the mind of Dr. Liz MacDonald to a worldwide initiative that has contributed research and discoveries to aurora science. At its heart, Aurorasaurus is a community effort, only possible through the contributions of thousands of citizen scientists, scientific experts, team members and volunteers.[…]

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Science Experiments for the Public during the Solar Eclipse

By Dr. Liz MacDonald Learn more at our Twitter #citscichat with Dr. Caren Cooper (@CoopSciScoop) on Aug 17 at 4 pm ET. Participants from most of the projects highlighted here will participate. Over a century ago, American astronomer W.W. Campbell set up a 40 foot ‘Schaeberle camera’ in Jeur, India to take pictures and study[…]