A landscape with a sky crossed by green and purple bands of aurora, along with other sky phenomena: STEVE, the ISS, and Comet NEOWISE.

A Frenzy of Sky Phenomena: Reflections on a Once-in-a-Lifetime Chase

In the early morning hours of July 13, a slow-moving coronal mass ejection from the Sun arrived early on its journey to Earth. That afternoon, word spread across social media in Europe, Canada, and the US: there might be aurora tonight. No one knew, however, whether it would last long enough for this part of Earth[…]

A smartphone on the Aurorasaurus Twitter sits next to a small red long-necked dinosaur plush

It Takes a Community to Raise Aurorasaurus: Gratitude and Retrospective

Over the past decade, Aurorasaurus has grown from a persistent idea in the mind of Dr. Liz MacDonald to a worldwide initiative that has contributed research and discoveries to aurora science. At its heart, Aurorasaurus is a community effort, only possible through the contributions of thousands of citizen scientists, scientific experts, team members and volunteers.[…]

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Aurorasaurus Tracks St. Patrick’s Day storm on Social Media

By Nathan Case and Kasha Patel On Tuesday, March 17, 2015, as people adorned themselves with green clothing and infused their livers with green beer, Earth was experiencing the biggest geomagnetic storm of the last decade—leading to beautiful, widespread aurora around world. The red, white and green St. Patrick’s Day aurora was created through a[…]

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An “Awesomely Good” Aurora

By Meghan Mella In Swedish there is a phrase “himla bra” that basically means “awesomely good.” The word himla literally translates to sky or heaven, and I have to think this phrase came about from Swedes staring at the sky, admiring the goodness of the northern lights. I have been waiting and occasionally watching for[…]