A woman joyfully motions toward the sky

PANTS ON: A Newbie’s Guide to Aurora Terms

by Laura Brandt (with lots of help from Dr. Liz!) Since joining Aurorasaurus, I have learned a lot about auroras and the ways aurora chasers and scientists describe them. I’ve been taking notes and want to share my list of key terms—by a newbie, for newbies, and reviewed by a subject matter expert—as a big[…]

A graph shows a sudden upward jump in Solar Wind Power intensity

Laura Learns Aurora: I’ve Got the Power!

Laura here! I am an aurora enthusiast, but new to the science side. Fortunately, the Aurorasaurus blog and website are full of great resources that I’ll be sharing out as I cultivate my knowledge.  One of these is the Space Weather Data page, a graph that shows the strength of solar wind power. In short,[…]

noctilucent clouds streak the sky above a landscape and water.

Noctilucent Classics

Noctlilucent, or “night-shining” cloud season is around the solstice for most places, but it’s a little later in the first two weeks of August, when darkness returns, for noctilucent cloud season at high latitudes! “Noctilucent clouds gleam in late-summer evenings as if they’re lit from within, but it’s sunlight that makes them shine. They look[…]

A man photographs aurora in the snow. The graphic has the NASA and Aurorasaurus logos, and the quote "I do citizen science with Aurorasaurus because I am fascinated by nature and all of its wonders." - Hugo Sanchez

Chasing the Northern Lights!

Guest post by Aurorasaurus Ambassador Hugo Sanchez One of the things we love about the Aurorasaurus community is the wealth and variety of experience in aurora chasing. Each chaser has unique expertise to share, and while with so many locations around the world no aurora chasing guide is one size fits all, each provides useful[…]

A hand opens the 3D Printed Magnetosphere Model, revealing the internal structures

The Earth’s Magnetosphere—3D Printed!

In 2020, Aurorasaurus partnered with NASA’s STEAM Innovation Lab and NASA’s Magnetosphere Multiscale Mission (MMS) to design and create the world’s first 3D printed magnetosphere model. We have just released the beta version (1.0) and are excited for educators, Makers, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and the general public to beta test it on printers and[…]

Students smile in a Zoom group screenshot

Asking Questions—Like Scientists!

by Aurorasaurus and Friends Last month we received a letter with some GREAT questions from a class of Manitoba 4th graders! Below we have compiled some answers, along with details and resources for teachers and caregivers to help students dive in further. For some questions, we asked our science and museum colleagues. Scientists know a lot[…]

Animated gif showing how a user can turn the camera toward the sky to focus on dfiferent areas

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 3: Exploring Over a Thousand Nights of Aurora on Your Phone

Guest post by Jeremy Kuzub Attending AGU 20? Jeremy will be presenting Keogramist as a poster in The MacGyver Session: The Place for Novel, Exciting, Self-Made, Hacked, or Improved Sensors and Software Solutions to Understand Space Weather eLightning on December 15, 2020 at 6:00 AKT/7:00 PT/8:00 MT/9:00 CT/10:00 ET/15:00 UTC. There will be a Q&A element, so bring any questions[…]

An animation shows how the center slices of each moment in a moving all-sky camera are placed next to each other to create a keogram

Eyes on the Aurora, Part 2: What is a Keogram?

Guest post by Aurorasaurus Ambassador Jeremy Kuzub This article is the second of three about how researchers and citizen scientists record and explore years of auroral activity using all-sky cameras, keograms, and software visualizations. The first post is available here.  Looking Up The first step in aurora borealis research is just looking up at the night[…]

June 23, 2020

Another Lively Season of Night-Shining Clouds

by Kasha Patel Reposted from NASA Earth Observatory  Every summer in the Northern Hemisphere, electric blue streaks form high in the atmosphere. These seasonal clouds typically lurk about 80 kilometers (50 miles) overhead in the mesosphere around the Arctic, but every once in a while they form at lower latitudes. In 2019, the clouds showed up in places where[…]