A woman and two men stand in a field near trees, mountains, and a gathering of people.

Relationship With the Sun

Since time immemorial, humanity has developed a deep and multifaceted relationship with our nearest star. While each culture expresses that bond in its own way, humans share millennia of solar observation. The Sun makes life on Earth possible, and its ever-changing nature affects our daily lives. What does the Sun mean to you? In Kiuġuyat:[…]

A box highlights a tiny fragment of the sky

A Sky Full of Chocolate Sauce: Citizen Science with Aurora Zoo

by Dr. Liz MacDonald and Laura Brandt Originally posted to the Zooniverse blog Viewing the aurora in person is a magnificent experience, but due to location (or pesky clouds) it’s not always an option. Fortunately, citizen science projects like Aurorasaurus and Zooniverse’s Aurora Zoo make it easy to take part in aurora research from any[…]

A person wearing an N95-style mask looks through a large bank of windows at aurora

Like an Outdoor Nightclub: Q&A on Pulsating Auroras

Originally posted to NASA’s The Sun Spot blog NASA’s citizen science projects are collaborations between scientists and interested members of the public. Through these collaborations, volunteers known as citizen scientists have helped make thousands of important scientific discoveries. Aurorasaurus is one such project that tracks auroras around the world in real time via reports on[…]

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Be a Rocket Citizen Scientist: Help Study Pulsating Aurora!

On February 24, running through March 10, 2022, the watch begins for the perfect opportunity to launch a sounding rocket into a common but rarely-viewed type of aurora: the pulsating aurora. The NASA Loss through Auroral Microburst Pulsations (LAMP) mission will send instruments high above the auroral light. Read on to find out what the[…]

Two women in cold weather gear hold up sings that say 19 degrees Celsius, N 17.55, E 15.06, (Bamsebu), Happy Thanksgiving! (music notes) Love from Hilde, Sunniva, and Ettra" and "AGU 100."

Extreme Citizen Science: Seeing the Invisible

UPDATE 12.12.19 On Tuesday, December 10, Clemson University’s CHI rocket successfully launched, and Hearts in the Ice were able to take 65 timelapse photos at about an 80° angle: “When the text came in ‘ready to launch in seven minutes’ we dressed like firemen and we were out the door as quickly as possible….to experience all[…]

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Hearts in the Ice: Citizen Science in the Arctic

If you turn on the news for very long, you’re likely to hear about some of the changes our planet is going through. Temperatures are on the rise, glaciers are receding, precipitation patterns are changing ⁠— and many of these developments are most obvious in the polar regions.  A formidable two-woman team is heading to[…]