A landscape with a sky crossed by green and purple bands of aurora, along with other sky phenomena: STEVE, the ISS, and Comet NEOWISE.

A Frenzy of Sky Phenomena: Reflections on a Once-in-a-Lifetime Chase

In the early morning hours of July 13, a slow-moving coronal mass ejection from the Sun arrived early on its journey to Earth. That afternoon, word spread across social media in Europe, Canada, and the US: there might be aurora tonight. No one knew, however, whether it would last long enough for this part of Earth[…]

A computer-generated tent glows in a snowy forest, underneath fisheye video capture of the Northern Lights.

Exploring Aurora from Home

Aurora citizen science often involves gazing at the sky outdoors, but there is a lot of learning and citizen science that can be done from home! In this post, we have compiled some resources for families, students, and aurora enthusiasts. Best of all, we are here for you if you have questions on this material—tweet[…]

A black and white photo with slightly blurry stars and a pale, diagonal smear angling to the left over a rooftop is labeled "Carl Størmer's team, 1933. Geofysiske Publiskasjoner." Beneath it, a very similar, but colorful image of STEVE over a mountain is labeled "Hannahbella Nel, 2017."

When Størmer Met STEVE

A summary of a groundbreaking new paper by Dr. Michael Hunnekuhl and Dr. Liz MacDonald, published in Space Weather with open access: “Early Ground-Based Work by Auroral Pioneer Carl Størmer on the High Altitude Detached Subauroral Arcs now known as STEVE.”  In 2018, STEVE took the world by (solar) storm. The quirky little subauroral arc[…]

Two women hold up an award and plates of aurora and STEVE hummus

Nerdy Science Recipes for Your Next Party!

Each year, Goddard Space Flight Center holds a collegial poster party for scientists and engineers to showcase their ongoing research. One of the award categories is “Best Science as Food.” What better opportunity to try ideas for hands-on education? Aurorasaurus and our colleagues Dr. Anne-Marie Novo-Gradac and Dr. Kevin Novo-Gradac decided to represent the Heliophysics department by coming up[…]

Aurorasaurus Blog Image

An Interview with Jordan: STEVE Science Fair Winner

Jordan, an 8th grade student from Calgary, recently won the Rideau Park Science Fair with her poster on the new STEVE phenomena. Jordan tells Aurorasaurus more about her project and interest in aurora in this Q&A article. Read through to the end for some questions she asked Dr. Liz MacDonald, Aurorasaurus founder, also!

STEVE and the Milky Way at Childs Lake, Manitoba, Canada. Image courtesy of Krista Trinder

Mystery of Purple Lights in Sky Solved With Help From Citizen Scientists

For the first time, scientists had ground and satellite views of Steve. Scientists have now learned, despite its ordinary name, that Steve may be an extraordinary puzzle piece in painting a better picture of how Earth’s magnetic fields function and interact with charged particles in space. The findings are published in a study released today in Science Advances.