The HamSCI Workshop 2020 logo, courtesy HamSCI.

Notes from HamSci 2020: The Auroral Connection

This year’s Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation (HamSCI) Workshop 2020 took place online, over Zoom and YouTube Live. In this post, we’ll bring you details for how to watch the recorded presentations, summarize Aurorasaurus’ contributions to the presentation lineup, and share lessons learned for getting a conference online with a short turnaround.

A black and white photo with slightly blurry stars and a pale, diagonal smear angling to the left over a rooftop is labeled "Carl Størmer's team, 1933. Geofysiske Publiskasjoner." Beneath it, a very similar, but colorful image of STEVE over a mountain is labeled "Hannahbella Nel, 2017."

When Størmer Met STEVE

A summary of a groundbreaking new paper by Dr. Michael Hunnekuhl and Dr. Liz MacDonald, published in Space Weather with open access: “Early Ground-Based Work by Auroral Pioneer Carl Størmer on the High Altitude Detached Subauroral Arcs now known as STEVE.”  In 2018, STEVE took the world by (solar) storm. The quirky little subauroral arc[…]

Two women hold up an award and plates of aurora and STEVE hummus

Nerdy Science Recipes for Your Next Party!

Each year, Goddard Space Flight Center holds a collegial poster party for scientists and engineers to showcase their ongoing research. One of the award categories is “Best Science as Food.” What better opportunity to try ideas for hands-on education? Aurorasaurus and our colleagues Dr. Anne-Marie Novo-Gradac and Dr. Kevin Novo-Gradac decided to represent the Heliophysics department by coming up[…]

A smartphone on the Aurorasaurus Twitter sits next to a small red long-necked dinosaur plush

It Takes a Community to Raise Aurorasaurus: Gratitude and Retrospective

Over the past decade, Aurorasaurus has grown from a persistent idea in the mind of Dr. Liz MacDonald to a worldwide initiative that has contributed research and discoveries to aurora science. At its heart, Aurorasaurus is a community effort, only possible through the contributions of thousands of citizen scientists, scientific experts, team members and volunteers.[…]

Two women in cold weather gear hold up sings that say 19 degrees Celsius, N 17.55, E 15.06, (Bamsebu), Happy Thanksgiving! (music notes) Love from Hilde, Sunniva, and Ettra" and "AGU 100."

Extreme Citizen Science: Seeing the Invisible

UPDATE 12.12.19 On Tuesday, December 10, Clemson University’s CHI rocket successfully launched, and Hearts in the Ice were able to take 65 timelapse photos at about an 80° angle: “When the text came in ‘ready to launch in seven minutes’ we dressed like firemen and we were out the door as quickly as possible….to experience all[…]

Bamsebu (1)

Hearts in the Ice: Citizen Science in the Arctic

If you turn on the news for very long, you’re likely to hear about some of the changes our planet is going through. Temperatures are on the rise, glaciers are receding, precipitation patterns are changing ⁠— and many of these developments are most obvious in the polar regions.  A formidable two-woman team is heading to[…]

Aurorasaurus Blog Image

An Interview with Jordan: STEVE Science Fair Winner

Jordan, an 8th grade student from Calgary, recently won the Rideau Park Science Fair with her poster on the new STEVE phenomena. Jordan tells Aurorasaurus more about her project and interest in aurora in this Q&A article. Read through to the end for some questions she asked Dr. Liz MacDonald, Aurorasaurus founder, also!